The 5th Annual Toronto Mapuche Solidarity Film Festival

In memory of our Mapuche WEICHAFE [WARRIORS] MATIAS CATRILEO & ALEX LEMUN, & the many others (indigenous and non-indigenous) who have been murdered by the repressive forces of the Chilean State.

SATURDAY, APRIL 1st & SUNDAY APRIL 2nd

VICTORIA COLLEGE at the University of Toronto, Room 101

73 Queen’s Park Crescent

*ALL NON-ENGLISH LANGUAGE FILMS WITH ENGLISH SUBTITLES*

Donations Appreciated

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/673956192776744/

Organized by: The Women’s Coordinating Committee for a Free Wallmapu [Toronto] An OPIRG Toronto Action Group

Sponsored by: The Department of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of Toronto

OPIRG Toronto

Endorsed by: Harvest Noon

Toronto Anarchist Reading Group

***

OPENING NIGHT –  SATURDAY, APRIL 1ST

5PM – OPENING RECEPTION feat. the SubMedia Collective

GUEST SPEAKERS:

Frank @ SubMedia (Director of Killing the Black Snake: Behind the Scenes of the #NoDAPL Struggle)

This year we are proud to present the director of Killing the Black Snake: Behind the Scenes of the #NoDAPL Struggle, made by our friends at the SubMedia Collective on the ongoing struggle against the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL).

SubMedia.tv is a video production ensemble, which aims to promote anarchist and anti-capitalist ideas, and aid social struggles through the dissemination of radical films and videos. Founded in 1994, subMedia.tv has produced hundreds of videos on everything from anti-globalization protests to films about shoplifting. Their films have been screened around the world in social centers and movie theaters and have been watched by millions on the internet.

Sigrid Knieve and Carrie Lester –  indigenous land defenders, water protectors and social justice advocates to speak on the recent developments at Standing Rock Sioux Reservation and the ongoing struggle against pipelines locally and throughout Turtle Island.

6PM – Trouble – Killing the Black Snake: Behind the Scenes of the #NoDAPL Struggle, Turtle Island, 2017 (30 minutes)

Since December of 2016, the Submedia Collective have been developing “Trouble,” a new monthly show offering in-depth anarchist analysis on various topics, struggles and movement dynamics.  Killing the Black Snake: Behind the Scenes of the #NoDAPL Struggle, is the first to be published in the documentary series depicting the recent struggle to protect sacred indigenous lands and waters at Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. The motivation in producing this film was to shed light on the important contributions made by indigenous warriors on the frontline to the broader struggle against the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL).

6:30PM – Eyes of a Woman: Glance of the Earth, Puelmapu, 2012 (51 minutes)

A film by Mapuche Feminist and Warrior, Moira Millan.

See Trailer here: https://www.facebook.com/180896458609033/videos/1467565923275407/

Mapuche activist, feminist, and warrior from Puelmapu (so-called Argentina), Moira Millan, depicts the plight of her people for the reclamation of land and culture through her own eyes as an indigenous woman. Having had to migrate from the Patagonia region to the City of Buenos Aires as a child, she decides to return to the land of her roots where her mother’s remains are buried. The film raises many issues on the preservation of Mapuche indigenous identity in today’s Argentina, where Moira travels to visit women of other indigenous communities, sharing the experience of preserving ancestral culture through education, health, music and taking back the land.

8PM – Embrace of the Serpent, Colombia/Abya Yala, 2016 (125 minutes)

*** Academy Awards Nomination for Best Foreign Language Film, 2016. Winner of the Ariel Award for Best Ibero-American Film, 2016. Winner of the Fénix Film Award for Best Direction, 2015.***

See Trailer here: https://www.facebook.com/180896458609033/videos/1458272330871433/

Embrace of the Serpent details the story of Karamakate, an Amazonian shaman and the last survivor of his people, dealing with two visiting European scientists in search for a sacred healing rainforest plant over the course of 40 years. The impact of the extractivist caucho (rubber) wars, the sect-like influence of the Church, and Eurocentric ignorance to the land and its peoples become increasingly apparent throughout their journeys, with Karamakate presented as the voice of wisdom and disdain towards European encroachment. The film was inspired by the real-life journals of two explorers (Theodor Koch-Grünberg and Richard Evans Schultes) who traveled through the Colombian Amazon during the last century in search of the sacred and difficult-to-find psychedelic Yakruna plant.

SUNDAY, APRIL 2nd

1PM – Strawberry and Chocolate, Cuba, 1993 (110 min)

***Winner of the Goya Award for Best Foreign Language Film, 1995; the ACRI-NOVA Award at the Havana International Film Festival, 1993; the Silver Berlin Bear Award at the Berlin International Film Festival and Honorable Mention at the Sundance Film Festival, 1995. Nominated for Best Foreign Language Film at the Academy Awards, 1995.

See Trailer here: https://youtu.be/bWioIOaw7eU

Havana 1993 –  Queerness, prejudice and the questioning of gender and political binaries are highlighted in Tomas Gutierrez Alea’s Strawberry and Chocolate. The renowned Cuban Director (“Memories of Underdevelopment,” 1968),  Gutierrez Alea delivers a refreshing critical lens into contemporary Cuban society. David is a student of Social Sciences in the University of Havana. Diego is a homosexual that lives for and to exalt cuban culture. One opens up to the complex world of personal realities, the other fights to be recognized and not be discriminated because of his sexual preferences. David and Diego, two human beings apparently opposite, separated by prejudices, distanced by their political, cultural and sexual preferences, find the difficult road towards friendship. A universal conflict form part of the lights and shadows of Havana and the spectacular unaffordable cost of cuban culture. Strawberry and Chocolate is not a movie about the seduction of a body, but about the seduction of a mind; a true reflection of understanding and solidarity.

3PM – The Colony [“Colonia Dignidad”], Chile/England, 2015 (120 minutes)

See Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GIDcyadRqy4

Based on true events.  Chile 1973: a young woman’s desperate search for her abducted boyfriend draws her into the infamous Colonia Dignidad, ex-Nazi cult founded by Wehrmacht officer and Hitler Youth veteran Paul Schäfer from which no one has ever escaped. Colonia Dignidad was one of the central torture centres of Pinochet’s military regime, where hundreds of people were tortured, murdered and disappeared.

5PM – The Baader-Meinhof Complex, Germany, 2008 (184 minutes)

***Nominated for Best for Best Foreign Language Film at the Academy Awards, 2009; Golden Globe Nominee for Best Foreign Language Film, 2009. Best Film Production at the Bavarian Film Awards***

See Trailer here: https://www.facebook.com/180896458609033/videos/1458290574202942/

Germany 1967. The children of the Nazi generation have grown up in the devastation their parents created. They vowed fascism would never rule again. Director Uli Edel teams with screenwriter Bernd Eichinger to explore this drama detailing the rise and fall of the Red Army Faction. Andreas Baader, Gudrun Ensslin, and Ulrike Meinhof – the central founders of the RAF – are inflamed by worldwide and local events, such as Vietnam, and German industrialism, which lead them to conclude that violence is the only effective form of opposition.

8PM – In the Name of the Father, Ireland, 1993 (133 minutes)

See Trailer here: https://www.facebook.com/180896458609033/videos/1457297594302240/

The film tells the true story of Irish youth, Gerry Conlon, one of the “Guildford Four” who were handed life sentences for wrongful conviction of an IRA bombing in 1974, where he and his father are taken to prison. Working with a fiercely dedicated lawyer, Gerry determines to prove his innocence, clear his father’s name and expose the truth behind one of the most shameful legal events in recent history.

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About The Women's Coordinating Committee For a Free Wallmapu [Toronto]

The Women's Coordinating For a Free Wallmapu is an indigenous grassroots organization based in Toronto advocating for the sovereign rights of the Mapuche Nation.
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