The 4th Annual Toronto Mapuche Solidarity Film Festival

 

4th Toronto Mapuche Solidarity Film FestivalIn memory of our Mapuche WEICHAFE [WARRIORS] MATIAS CATRILEO & ALEX LEMUN, & the many others (indigenous and non-indigenous) who have been murdered by the repressive forces of the Chilean State.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26th & SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27th

OISE – 252 Bloor Street West

*ALL NON-ENGLISH LANGUAGE FILMS WITH ENGLISH SUBTITLES*

Suggested donation $10 per day at the door (No one turned away for lack of funds)

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/1536686799993450/

Speakers TBA!

Organized by: The Women’s Coordinating Committee for a Free Wallmapu [Toronto] An OPIRG Toronto Action Group

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OPENING NIGHT: FRIDAY, FEB 26th (OISE Rm 4414)

6PM – Sewatokwa’tshera’t: The Dish with One Spoon, Six Nations/Turtle Island, 2008 (82 minutes).

Commemorating 10th anniversary since the Six Nations Reclamation of Kanonhstaton, WCCC [Toronto] proudly presents the screening of Sewatokwa’tshera’t: The Dish with One Spoon. We wish the most profound NEWEN to our Haudenosaunee sisters and brothers in the ongoing struggle against colonial encroachment.

We have the honour of having SPEAKERS from Six Nations of the Grand River Territory:

Janie Jameson, one of the founders of the Six Nations Reclamation site, Kanonhstaton, the protected place. 

Dr. Dawn Martin-Hill, Associate Professor at McMaster University and director of the film Sewatokwa’tshera’t: The Dish with One Spoon.

Outlining the intricate history of the Haudenosaunee Peoples, Dr. Dawn Martin-Hill depicts the process of indigenous self-governance, colonial displacement and resistance to ongoing encroachment in the film, Sewatokwa’tshera’t: The Dish with One Spoon. Culminating in the 2006 reclamation of the Douglas Creek Estates subdivision – Kanonhstaton (“the protected place”) – the film explores the development of Haudenosaunee nation to nation treaties with the Dutch and English Crowns, and the succeeding encroachment of the Canadian State on Six Nations land. The film features an intimate view into the events of the Six Nations Reclamation, including the Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) raid on April 20th 2006, and neighbouring settler backlash/racism. The resilience of a community reflected in its youth, is seen through the Unity Run and Youth Declaration to the UN Assembly in 2007, following in the footsteps of Deskaheh for the next seven generations.

7:30PM – NGÜENÉN: The Deceit [El Engaño), Wallmapu, 2012 (81 minutes)

A documentary made by the directors of “El Despojo” (The Plunder) focusing on the international political dynamics of the “War on Terror,” and the counterintelligence strategies used to criminalize the Mapuche struggle for Autonomy and Territorial Reclamation. Lies and deceit are as old as war itself. The objective of these intelligence actions called “Psychological Operations” (or PsyOps) is to destroy the morale of the enemy and assure the approval of the population through propaganda, misinformation, manipulation, the fabrication of news, omission, decontextualization (etc). Everything to allow for a SETUP, since “to convince is to overcome.” Chilean Prosecutor, Mario Elgueta, whom was the alleged victim of an annihilating attack in southern Chile, was also a student in an FBI and CSIS antiterrorist course in Virginia USA. Later, the events became grounds for 17 Mapuche land defenders to face trial under the Antiterrorist Law, at first risking a total of up to 800 years in prison. Four bicentennials on the backs of those who oppose the arrogance of the Chilean State. A must see film on the ongoing criminalization of the indigenous Mapuche struggle.

9PM – Trick or Treaty, Turtle Island, 2014 (84 minutes).

This feature documentary by acclaimed filmmaker Alanis Obomsawin (Kanehsatake: 270 Years of Resistance) profiles Indigenous leaders in their quest for justice as they seek to establish dialogue with the Canadian government. By tracing the history of their ancestors since the signing of Treaty No. 9, these leaders aim to raise awareness about issues vital to First Nations in Canada: respect for and protection of their lands and their natural resources, and the right to hunt and fish so that their societies can prosper. In recent years, an awareness-raising movement has been surfacing in First Nations communities. In this powerful documentary, those who refuse to surrender are given a chance to speak out.

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SATURDAY, FEB 27th – OISE Rm 2211

3:30PM – Born in Gaza, Palestine, 2014 (78 minutes).

This Spanish documentary, shot in 2014, examines the effects of the Israel-Palestine conflict on Palestinian children. In July 2014, images of an air strike on a Gaza beach which killed four soccer-playing youngsters went global, prompting Spanish director Hernan Zin to fly in and shoot a documentary about the plight of Palestine’s children. The result is Born in Gaza, an inevitably powerful and depressing record of man’s inhumanity to its own offspring whose primary virtue is in retelling a story which constantly needs to be retold.

5PM – State of Siege, Uruguay/France, 1972 (121 minutes)

Costa-Gavras puts the United States’ involvement in Latin American politics under the microscope in this arresting thriller. An urban guerrilla group, outraged at the counterinsurgency and torture training clandestinely organized by the CIA in their country (unnamed in the film), abducts a U.S. official (Yves Montand) to bargain for the release of political prisoners; soon the kidnapping becomes a media sensation, leading to violence. Co-written by Franco Solinas, the electrifying State of Siege piercingly critiques the American government for supporting foreign dictatorships, while also asking difficult questions about the efficacy of radical violent acts to oppose such regimes.

6:30PM – Lucio, Spain/France, 2007 (93 minutes).

“The banks are the real crooks,” says Lucio Urtubia decisively. “They exploit you, take your money and cause all the wars.” Directed by Aitor Arregi and Jose Mari Goenaga, Lucio is an engaging portrait of the anarchist Lucio Urtubia, born in Northern Spain in 1931, and who deserted from the Spanish army during his military service, going on to work as a tiler in Paris, where he immersed himself in the world of the Spanish exiles. Rapidly inter-cut archive images, interview fragments and reconstructed impressions are used to look back on his incredible life. A meeting with the legendary Quico Sabaté (1915-1960) put Lucio on the anarchist path, whereby his talents as a forger of identity papers and currency came in particularly useful. His real anarchist nature is revealed in his highly particular, carelessly expressed visions of phenomena such as Franco, Che Guevara, Fidel Castro, the Black Panthers, May 1968 and the institution of marriage. Bringing the most powerful bank in the world to its knees, Lucio is a gripping story of how a working class brick layer can forge solidarity beyond sectarian lines for the liberation of peoples across the world.

8:30PM – A Good Day to Die, Turtle Island, 2010 (90 minutes)

Dennis Banks co-founded the American Indian Movement (A.I.M.) in 1968 to call attention to the plight of urban Indians in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The film presents an intimate look at Dennis Banks’ life beginning with his early experience in boarding schools, through his military service in Japan, his transformative experience in Stillwater State Prison and subsequent founding of a movement that, through confrontational actions in Washington DC, Custer South Dakota and Wounded Knee, changed the lives of American Indians forever.

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About The Women's Coordinating Committee For a Free Wallmapu [Toronto]

The Women's Coordinating For a Free Wallmapu is an indigenous grassroots organization based in Toronto advocating for the sovereign rights of the Mapuche Nation.
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