CHILE: SEPTEMBER 11TH, 1973: Film Series – VICTOR JARA, SALVADOR ALLENDE + MARTYRS & EXECUTIONERS

September 11th BBLC Film Series - VICTOR JARA, SALVADOR ALLENDE, MARTYRS & EXECUTIONERS copyBlack Bird Liberation Cinema Presents:
SEPTEMBER 11TH, 1973: 40 YEARS AFTER THE COUP D’ÉTAT IN CHILE…

A Film Series commemorating the 40th Anniversary of the Bloody Coup D’état in Chile, Documenting the Process(es) of Popular Power, and the State Repression Before and After the Coup.

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 15TH @ The Harvest Noon Café (GSUT)(Beginning at 3PM)
16 Bancroft Avenue (Behind the Koffler Building at 569 Spadina Avenue)

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/496675153764119/

*$ 5-10 Sliding Scale Donation at the Door (or PWYC)
* EMPANADAS & SOPAIPILLAS PASADAS (*Vegan option*), BORGOÑA with Strawberries
*All Films with English Subtitles

****************************

3PM: VICTOR JARA – THE RIGHT TO LIVE IN PEACE
A Film by Carmen Luz Parot (1999) 100 mins

The film covers the life of Chilean singer/songwriter Victor Jara. His humble beginnings as a peasant, his youth in a marginalized neighbourhood in Santiago, his work in theatre, his carrier as a musician and his compromise with Left social thought, which comes into power through the government of Salvador Allende in 1970. Finally the tragic ending; Allende dies in the Presidential Palace, Jara is tortured at the Chile Stadium, sports centre turned concentration camp for those arrested after September 11th, 1973, and is murdered with impunity. As with many, his widow Joan Turner must leave the country where she begins a fierce struggle to recover the legacy of Victor, whose works are destroyed and prohibited in the country.

The documentary makes a parallel between the story of Jara and the historical processes carried out within the country. The migration from the countryside to the city during the 1950’s, the immense growth of poverty in the peripheries of the Capital, the rebirth of culture during the 60’s where the greatest works the country has known were published (Pablo Neruda, Violeta, Isabel and Angel Parra, Roberto Matta, and Raul Ruiz), and the military Coup of 1973, the abuse of power, and the beginning of complete cultural obscurantism.

5PM: SALVADOR ALLENDE
A Film by Patricio Guzman (2003) 100 min

In SALVADOR ALLENDE, acclaimed Chilean filmmaker Patricio Guzmán (The Battle of Chile and Chile, Obstinate Memory) returns to his native country thirty years after the 1973 military coup that overthrew Chile’s Popular Unity government to examine the life of its leader, Salvador Allende, both as a politician and a man.

Using rare archival footage, interviews with Allende’s friends, professional colleagues, his daughters and other relatives as well as workers, journalists, his personal secretary and Edward Korry, former U.S. Ambassador to Chile, SALVADOR ALLENDE portrays the life, times and political formation of the Valparaiso-born doctor who was a lifetime socialist. The film draws parallels between his own life, the dynamic s of the Popular Unity government and the rise of Popular Power from the grassroots, uncovering the many contradictions and tensions between the various positions within the Left in Allende’s vision of the democratic transition to socialism; “how could one be a democrat and revolutionary at the same time?”

FILM FESTIVAL AWARDS:
OFFICIAL SELECTION, Cannes 2004

BEST EUROPEAN DOCUMENTARY, Annecy 2004

GRAND PRIX, Lima 2004 PEOPLE’S CHOICE, Salzberg 2005

ALTAZOR PRIZE, Chile 2005

7PM: MATIRES AND EXECUTIONERS
A Film by ProyectoDocumental1 (2009) 50 min

This is not a film about Human Rights. The names of the protagonists of this story, the militants of the VOP (Organized Vanguard of the People) do not appear in any memorial or official Human Rights report of the Chilean State; you can spend entire afternoons in various cemeteries across Santiago in search for their graves. Nonetheless, their example clearly establishes that torture, death and political execution did not begin on September 11th, 1973, much less did not end with the return of bourgeois “democracy” in 1990, especially for those who sought armed struggle.

The film examines the massacre of Puerto Montt peasants by then Interior Minister Edmundo Perez Zujovic during the government of Eduardo Frei and his later execution during Allende’s Popular Unity by members of the VOP. The film presents that confrontation is produced everyday and the necessity of a new morale is always present in order to establish that those whom appeared to be martyrs of democracy, where and still are the executioners of the People.

Organized by: The Women’s Coordinating Committee for a Free Wallmapu
https://wccctoronto.wordpress.com

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About The Women's Coordinating Committee For a Free Wallmapu [Toronto]

The Women's Coordinating For a Free Wallmapu is an indigenous grassroots organization based in Toronto advocating for the sovereign rights of the Mapuche Nation.
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